food fanatic.bookaholic.mommy

Caribbean Beef Stew

I admit that I am not the world’s best food writer or photographer.  Maybe I will get a little better over time, or maybe not. I won’t spend too much time or energy fretting about it. 

 I mostly started this blog odyssey just for my self and my own sanity. I have so many cookbooks and so many recipes bookmarked on the internet (hello!!  my epicurious.com recipe box has close to 800 recipes in it) that I would lose track of where my favorite recipes were from and what recipes I had already tried.   It also gives me a way to link friends to the recipes I’ve made and my thoughts on the books I read.

I have a Crock Pot that I got as a wedding or shower gift from my mother.  I like to break it out every few months to cook dinner on the weekend.  My commute to work and working schedule being what it is, slow cooker meals aren’t really something I can do on weekdays…since I am away from the house for too long.  So…weekends it is.

This Caribbean Beef Stew has an interesting combination of flavors and is loaded with great color and texture. 

Caribbean Beef Stew

  • 1 lb stew beef
  • 3 1/2 cups diced butternut squash (or pumpkin)
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1-inch piece fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 14 oz canned chopped tomatoes
  • 14 oz canned pigeon peas, drained and rinsed
  • 14 oz canned black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed
  • salt and pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Trim visible fat off beef, then dice the meat into 2 inch pieces.
  2. Heat a large heavy pan without adding any oil.  Add the meat and cook, stirring constantly for a few minutes until browned all over. 
  3. Stir in the pumpkin, onion, and bell pepper and cook for 1 minute, then add the paprika, cayenne, broth, and tomatoes. Bring to a boil.

  1. Transfer the mixture to the slow cooker, cover, and cook on low for 7 hours. 
  2. Add the pigeon peas and black-eyed peas to the stew and season to taste with salt and pepper. 
  3. Re-cover and cook on high for 30 minutes.

(serves 6)

Dips can be mega-easy to make and can usually be prepared a day or so ahead of when they are served…and be all the better for being prepared ahead since it gives time for the flavors to meld and develop.   I am all for not going completely crazy on the day of an event. (even though despite all my prep work ahead of time I do still tend to veer towards the loony bin in the hour leading up to a party…someday I will learn to calm down, really!)

I found the original version of this recipe on Epicurious.com but altered it since at the time I didn’t have whole cumin or caraway seeds on hand.  This Roasted Pepper and Garlic dip takes a little more work than some other dips, that are basically one step of throwing everything in a bowl and mixing it. For this dip you first oven roast a red pepper and garlic cloves.  These roasted veggies are then blended with the remaining dip ingredient to create a lovely orange dip with a ton of flavor.

Roasted Red Pepper and Garlic Dip

(serves 6)

  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 small head garlic
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne/red pepper
  1. Pre-heat oven to 450 F
  2. Quarter bell pepper lengthwise and discard stem, seeds, and ribs. In a shallow baking pan arrange quarters skin sides up.
  3. Separate garlic cloves, leaving skins intact. Wrap together in foil. Add garlic package to pan with bell pepper and bake in upper third of oven 20 minutes.
  4. When cool enough to handle, peel pepper and transfer to a blender. Remove garlic from foil and squeeze pulp into blender.
  5. Add remaining ingredients to blender and puree until smooth.
  6. Serve with veggies such as carrot sticks, zucchini spears, fennel crudites, or celery sticks.

Dip can be made 5 days ahead and chilled, covered.

Kofta Kebabs have been a favorite of my husband’s since he was a little boy growing up in Pakistan.   For those who don’t know kofta are kebabs made of  spiced ground meat.  We make them several times a month in our house….all different varieties. I am constantly on the lookout for new recipes.  I found this recipe in FOOD Everyday magazine.  I tweaked the amounts on the spices a little bit to meet our taste preferences.

The recipe came together fairly easily and is perfect for a weeknight meal.  Give them a try if you are looking for something new to add to your dinner rotation!

Middle Eastern Chicken Kofta Pockets

(adapted from FOOD Everyday magazine)

  • 1 pound ground chicken
  • 2 large egg whites, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup plain dried breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • pita pockets, for serving
  • lettuce, sliced tomatoes, and sliced cucumber, for serving

Minted Yogurt Sauce

  • 1 cup plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • coarse salt
  • ground black pepper
  1. Heat broiler, with rack in highest position.
  2. In a large bowl, combine chicken, egg whites, breadcrumbs, onion, cilantro, garlic, salt, and spices and mix until well blended.
  3. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and drizzle with 1 tablespoon oil.
  4. Divide chicken mixture into 8 portions and place on sheet. Shape each into an oval patty and use your hand to flatten slightly. Drizzle 1 tablespoon oil over patties.
  5.  Broil until lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Flip and cook until cooked though, about 4 minutes more.
  6. Yogurt Sauce:  In a small bowl, stir together yogurt, mint and lime juice. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. Serve patties in pita pockets with lettuce, tomato, cucumber, and yogurt sauce.

The Devil and Miss PrymThe Devil and Miss Prym by Paulo Coelho
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

View all my reviews

Paulo Coelho‘s The Alchemist book is one of those books that I categorize as having a rabid, zealous following…much like Ayn Rand’s books, and to some extent The Catcher in the Rye…books that some people claim they love or were life-changing.  I read The Alchemist years ago hoping that it would be a book that I loved.  I enjoyed it but angels didn’t sing and fireworks didn’t go off while I read it. It was okay but not the best book ever (in my opinion).

A couple of years ago I read Coelho’s Veronika Decides to Die and ended up really liking it.  It made me decide that I really should read more of Coelho’s books…so I took The Devil and Miss Prym out from the library and set off. I picked this particular book because it is also on the list of 1001 books to read before you die. 

Once again, Coelho has written a fable. This one is set in a remote mountain village. A stranger shows up in the village one day and talks with Miss Prym, a villager who works at the local inn and bar.  The stranger show Miss Prym a fortune in gold and tells her that if the villagers kill one of their own, they can have all of the gold.  The stranger is trying to find out if people are at their core good or evil.

So how did I feel about The Devil and Miss Prym?  Once again, this was a book that fell into the “it was okay” camp.  I didn’t love it.   It felt a little flat to me.  The characters were one-dimensional and not very believable. Nevermind that none of the characters were likeable in any way.  Deep down I didn’t care what decision they made or what happened to them.  The book was loaded with parables but the main story line was lackluster and did little to pull me in.  It would have been better if it was edited to be at least 100 pages shorter. In a nutshell: this book was just ‘meh’ to me.  I will cling fondly to my memories of “Veronika Decides to Die”: my past and still current favorite Coelho book.

AusterlitzAusterlitz by W.G. Sebald
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

View all my reviews

Translated into English from the original German, Austerlitz is filled with beautiful, complex prose that is best read slowly.  The novel features an unnamed narrator recounts his encounters and discussions with a man called “Austerlitz”.  Austerlitz is a middle-aged man in search of answers about his past.  His past is slowly uncovered through a series of digressions and fractured narratives.  At every meeting with Austerlitz the narrator finds out more about him through discussions about memories and architecture.  We learn about how the Holocaust tore apart Austerlitz and his family and how a young Austerlitz repressed those memories to the point that he actually thought he was the son of the Welsh couple who took him in.

This book was a challenge to read, especially in the beginning and it definitely isn’t for everyone. There were sentences that went on for 5+ pages and the narrative style is far from what you usually find in novels.  But if you are up for a reading challenge with a book that requires your full attention you should consider reading Austerlitz.

My Top Music of 2010

A couple of weeks late for this 2010 round-up post, but here goes.  According to Last.FM my top 10 most listened to artists of 2010 were:

  1. The NationalI particularly like the song Conversation 16.  What is not to like about a song that mentions eating brains??
  2. New Order - one of my all time favorite groups
  3. Arcade Fire - along with The National’s latest album, the new Arcade Fire album was one of my most listened to new albums of 2010
  4. Radiohead – another favorite I can listen to over and over again each year
  5. The Beatles - my mom loved them and so do I!
  6. Iron & Wine-  good music to relax to. sure to calm you down….maybe a bit too much. Plus you gotta love that beard. ;)
  7. Bjork – love her unique sound
  8. LCD Soundsystem - always gets me up and moving
  9. Joy Division – with New Order on this list it is not that unexpected to find their spawn Joy Division here as well.  Listening to Joy Division always makes me think of the movie 24 Hour Party People. It also makes me think of the Wombats song “Let’s Dance to Joy Division”
  10. Amy Winehouse - I know she isn’t the ideal role model, but I still like her music. It sets a certain mood.

 

What music did you find yourself listening to a lot over the past year?  Discover any new music that you love and care to share with me?

Mexican Layered Dip

I was looking for a starter that was super easy, festive looking and didn’t take up excessive amounts of space in the fridge (fridge space is precious during the holidays!!).   I found it in this Mexican layered dip. We’ve all have layered dips and they come in varying degrees of difficulty. This one was pretty simple using some prepped items but letting you feel like you were kind of making it from scratch. (I love to prepare things from scratch but occasionally like tho be able to take a few shortcuts.)

I altered a recipe from Bon Apetit’s Outdoor Entertaining cookbook by subbing veggie refried beans for the kind with bacon, upping the spices, and tweaking other ingredient amounts.  The assembled dip looked bright and festive on the buffet table and received lots of comments from guests.

Mexican Layered Dip

(altered from recipe in Bon Appetit Outdoor Entertaining)

  • 2 cans of vegetarian refried beans
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 2 1/2 cups guacamole
  • 1/2 cup tomatillo salsa (salsa verde)
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2 cups grated cheddar cheese (about 8 oz)
  • 2 14.5 ounce cans diced tomatoes with jalapenos, well-drained
  • 3/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 1 1/2 cups reduced fat sour cream
  • 2/3 cups chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 small can sliced black olives, drained
  • Tortilla chips

DIRECTIONS

  1. Mix beans and chili powder in a medium bowl to blend.  
  2. Mix guacamole, tomatillo salsa, and garlic in another medium bowl.
  3. Spread half of bean mixture in bottom of 8 – 10 cup glass bowl. Sprinkle with 1 cup of cheese.
  4. Spread guacamole mixture over. Spoon half of drained tomatoes over the guacamole.
  5. Sprinkle with green onions.
  6. Spread remaining bean mixture over.
  7. Stir sour cream in container to loosen. Spread over bean mixture, covering completely.
  8. Arrange cilantro, remaining cheese, olives, and remaining drained tomatoes in concentric circles on top of the sour cream. 
  9. Cover; Refrigerate at least 2 hours.
  10. Serve dip with chips.

NOTE: Dip can be assembled 1 day ahead. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and keep refrigerated.

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