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Reads: The Book Thief

The Book Thief The Book Thief by Markus Zusak



rating: 4.5 of 5 stars

Yet another book that made me cry at the end! I can be such a sap sometimes.

This book is classified in bookstores as Young Adult, but I would put it towards the upper age range of young adult (upper teens) or adult since it deals with a pretty heavy subject matter and is peppered with the occassional curses. (protect those virgin ears!)

The book thief referenced by the title is a young German girl named Liesel Meminger who is sent to live with a foster family in Molching, Germany during the outset of the Nazi reign. At the start of the novel, Liesel’s 6 year old brother dies and while at the burial, Liesel notices that one of the gravediggers drops a book in the snow. Liesel picks up the book, “The Gravedigger’s Handbook: A Twelve-Step Guide to Grave-Digging Success” and claims it as her own, even though she can’t read. And so starts her career as a book thief. Liesel’s foster father teaches her to read and the book thief’s passion for books and reading only grows. Books and reading help Liesel form a bond with her foster father, a neighborhood woman, and a young Jewish man.

The story is narrated by Death, who peppers the story with bad jokes, asides, and foreshadowing of which characters will meet an untimely demise. Death admits at the end of the tale: ” I am haunted by humans”.

“The Book Thief” is simply written and yet is filled with powerful scenes. It reveals the humanity of people trying to carry on their lives during a difficult time. This is a very touching story recommended for all book lovers.

Best Snack to eat while reading this book: pea soup and bread everyday until you finish the book

Best Music to Listen to while reading this book: accordian music

View all my reviews.

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Comments on: "Reads: The Book Thief" (1)

  1. […] influence the main character Mathilda’s life.  I recommend this book to anyone who enjoyed The Book Thief or The Shadow of the Wind, both of which are also novels about how books had an effect on a young […]

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